Unlocking Greatness Through Mental Toughness And A Killer Instinct With Dave Anderson

Skot Waldron:

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Welcome to another episode of Unlocked where we talk about unlocking the potential of people or ourselves in order to unlock the potential of our organizations and humanity. I'm so, so stoked to have Dave Anderson on the show today. If you don't know Dave, you should. He is probably one of the best soundbite masters I've ever met. You're going to hear so many great soundbites out of this interview you're going to want to get a pen and paper. Or if you're driving, just go back later and listen to it or watch it or whatever, and write these things down. I was trying to do it the whole time I'm doing this interview. I'm just like, John, John, John. I don't know even think I got them all. So I'm going to have to rewatch it so I can get all these soundbites done.

Dave has spoken in 20 different countries across the world. His influence is on 145 different countries. He's written 15 books. He just has a new one out called Intentional Mindset that you've got to get your hands on that walks through a process of developing an intentional mindset and structured out for you over 70 days to help you build that. And we're going to talk about that in the interview. So I'm really excited. Let's get ready to talk to Dave. Let's do it.

Welcome to the show, Dave. It's good to have you.

Dave Anderson:

Hey, thank you for having me, Skot. Looking forward to it.

SKOT WALDRON:

Yeah, this is going to be good. Your bio just blows my mind. I've had different authors on the show over the past few months. But I don't know if I've had one that's written 15 books. That's quite an accomplishment. You must like writing books.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Well, either that or it means I'm getting really old. I don't know. 

SKOT WALDRON:

Yeah.

DAVE ANDERSON:

But I do. And this last one, I didn't plan on being able to write last year. But when the shutdown happened, our business got shut down for a number of months. It created a great opportunity to get it off the drawing board and to put it out there. So, I enjoy it. And then I really like going out and speaking on those topics and helping others put it to practice.

SKOT WALDRON:

Very cool. Let's talk about the title, right? First of all, it's all about that mental toughness, developing that killer instinct. Why did you pick that for this one? Is it something you've covered in the past? Is this a new topic for you? But it's all about being intentional.

DAVE ANDERSON:

It is.

SKOT WALDRON:

So talk about that.

DAVE ANDERSON:

You know, Intentional Mindset, I was on an interview earlier today and they said, "What do you mean by intentional?" And it's really about being on purpose, being more purposeful with keeping your thinking right. And this one, this book, Skot, really builds off my last one. I did a book called Unstoppable which really talked about developing the right mindset, being more careful of what you let in to your mind and being more consistent, making fewer excuses. Just doing something every day to really stop leaving it up for grabs for the news and for social media and all the nonsense to hijack it and to get control of it. Because the fact is, it doesn't matter how great your skills, your knowledge, your talent, or your experience, if your thinking isn't right, those things aren't going to be activated to the level that they should.

And so, that book did well, but I wanted to take it to another level. And I wanted to zero in on killer instinct and mental toughness. Two different things. I talk about 10 different traits in the book that you can intentionally develop that will help strengthen and fuel killer instinct and mental toughness. So this one is a more specific in depth version of Unstoppable.

SKOT WALDRON:

Let's talk about mental toughness, killer instinct. We hear about grit, right? How do you relate those? Do you talk about those ever in conjunction with each other? Is there a difference?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah, I do. I break them apart because some people have killer instinct, but don't have a lot of mental toughness. Some people have mental toughness, they don't have killer instinct that's very strong. People use those two terms like they're synonyms, and they're not. I explain it this way. Killer instinct gets you started. Mental toughness gives you finished. Killer instinct is about attacking goals. It's about changing things, taking risks. And it doesn't matter. I mean, the term gets used a lot in sports. And I work with some athletes and with some sports teams, but hey, if you've got a student trying to make an A, they're going to have to have some killer instinct. If you have someone that is trying to start a business or is trying to get promoted, or maybe somebody that is alone, somebody walked out of their life and they're looking for somebody new, they can't just sit around and wait always for something to happen. So, it's very applicable. Someone trying to get a new martial arts rank, go from a red belt to a black belt.

And then mental toughness is sticking with it. Because a lot of people are starting things, but they don't finish. They're starting to diet. They sign up for the gym. They begin the foreign language. They start to read the book. They start to write the book. They have this idea for a business that's on the blackboard and never gets put into place. And so, mental toughness helps you fight through the setbacks, the disappointments, the delays, the defeats to get to that goal. So you need both. I mean, some people are already starting. Now, other people, you can't get them started. It's like, you got to set their chair on fire to see some life out of them. But, once they get on it, they're on it. All right? They're like that starving dog on a pork chop bone. They are going to just gnaw every last morsel. So they've got great mental toughness. It's just hard to get them out of the gates. So we need both. It's not an either/or. These are supplements, not substitutes for each other.

SKOT WALDRON:

So, say I suck at one of those. Let's just say, right? Of course, I don't, Dave.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Of course not.

SKOT WALDRON:

Of course I'm amazing in both of them, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

No, you wouldn't be doing this.

SKOT WALDRON:

Of course. But let's say I suck at one of them. Is it something I can develop? Is that something I can learn? Or am I just like out of luck and I need to find somebody else maybe that compliments that, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Oh, you can definitely be if you're intentional. You can definitely develop these. I mean, you'd never see on a birth certificate low killer instinct or high mental toughness or positive or negative or high energy or slogger. These are things we become by choices we make. Mental toughness and killer instinct, we're all born with enough of it to cry when we're hungry and to keep screaming until we're fed. The culture we grow up in, the way we're raised, these things can help develop some of that, I mean, if we're pampered. If our parents remove all the struggle from our lives, that can put us at a great disadvantage. We haven't learned how to fight through things, how to earn things, how to persist. So a lot of it is part of how we're raised, where we're raised and so forth. But ultimately, we're responsible for it.

You get to the point to where I need to get better at this. And so how do you do it? Well, the one key thing that gets talked about a lot although it's not always connected to killer instinct and mental toughness is getting really clear about your reasons, really clear about your why. Simon Sinek has written and talked a lot about the why, but it's not a new concept. The why basically answers two questions. Why do you get up in the morning? And why should anybody else even care that you get up in the morning? In other words, what do you want for yourself? And who's counting on you to come through? If those reasons aren't compelling, if they aren't clear, if they're not relevant because it will change throughout your life, you're going to be all over the place. You don't have reasons to keep fighting. You don't have reasons to stay consistent. You don't have reasons to learn new things. You don't have reasons to take responsibility and stop making excuses. But the stronger your why, the more you fuel both killer instinct and mental toughness.

Now, there are many other things you can do. But this is where it starts. If you don't have something worth fighting for, you're not going to fight. If you don't have something worth fighting for, you're not going to start in the first place. Probably the most popular thing we have on our website is a free booklet. It's the Why booklet. You can download it and you work through it. It has five different categories of your life that help you really think about and clarify your why. I read mine every morning. I mean, before I go to work, before I leave the house, I review it every morning. And I get crystal clear about why I'm doing what I'm doing. Because now, I'm clear on my reasons and I don't give myself the option not to do the things I need to do as I would if I didn't have those reasons. So, that's where it starts.

SKOT WALDRON:

You said you do that on a daily basis?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Oh, yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

You have a daily why?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

Or are you saying you look at your big why?

DAVE ANDERSON:

No. It's my overall why, all right? But then what does that look like today? Part of my daily routine, I do a lot. I mean, I'm big on this. I've been doing it for many years. I keep adding things. And so, I don't watch the morning news. I don't read the morning newspaper. I don't let that stuff take a dump on my mind set. I'm aware. I'm not obsessed with world events, all right? I can't control that stuff. I need to focus on what I can control. How can I get stronger, wiser, better? How can I help other people? So, I have to be intentional to get my mind right. I can't leave it up for grabs. Again, the intentional work. If you're going to get in shape, you got to be intentional, right? You got to follow a process. You don't do five pushups every once in awhile and declare yourself fit for life.

There's things you've got to start doing, things you've got to stop doing. You have to do it over time. Why would we think the mind is any different? But most people are not intentional. So this is part of my intentional routine. I have a number of devotionals. I read it in the morning. I review my affirmations. I review my why. I fill out a gratitude journal. But I break it down. I have what I call a daily landing place. These are the four essential priorities I've got to execute today that are going to move me closer to that why. I may have 40 things I've got to do, but if I don't know what the four biggest are... I limit it to four, not 14, not 24. If everything's important, nothing's important, right? So if I could only do four things today that would be most predictive of taking me to where I want to go, what would they be? And they may change every day.

So I'm reviewing my why, the big picture. And then I'm looking, what does that look like today? And I'm talking about activities, not outcomes. I don't focus much on outcomes. I focus on the activities and the outcomes start to take care of themselves. And so, that's a daily thing. And now, when I get to work, I know what to attack. I see people coming to work, Skot, they don't know where to start. They're walking around with their coffee like a game show host for the first 45 minutes looking for the bagels or donuts, just talking small talk about what they heard on the news. They're just wasting this time. And now they have to spend more time at work trying to get done what they would have got done if they were actually working on the right things in the first place.

So I know what to attack. And the reason I call it my landing place is if I get off track, which I do, stuff happens, I have a place to go back and land. It's a great focus tool. And I have a very strong whys. It's very clear. It's changed a lot over the years. But it doesn't give me the option to make excuses like I used to. It doesn't give me the option not to do things that I need to do but I just don't feel like doing them so I'm not going to do them. It strips those options away. Most people give themselves too many options. And if you give yourselves too many options, you're going to do the wrong things with a lot of those options.

SKOT WALDRON:

You've said a lot of good things. Yeah, I just was all over the place this morning. I actually just had a quick bike before we got on our interview. I actually had that thought in my head. I said, "Man, I was floundering this morning." I don't know what I was doing. I don't know what I accomplished. I mean, I just went all over the place.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah, man. 

SKOT WALDRON:

If I would've had my landing place, I could have focused back on that. But I wasn't super intentional about my day to day. I mean, I had an interview this morning and then I've got some stuff. I'm going coaching sessions this afternoon. Thinking about that was really interesting that you said that because you also said something else. You're not focused on the outcomes.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

You're focused on the activities. I just started reading Atomic Habits by James Clear. He mentioned the same thing. He says too many of us focus on, "I need to lose 100 pounds," right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Right.

SKOT WALDRON:

"I need to lose 100 pounds" but not focused on the "What kind of person do I need to be to lose 100 pounds?"

DAVE ANDERSON:

Right.

SKOT WALDRON:

Or, somebody offers me a cigarette, right? It's not, "Oh, I'm trying to quit," right? "I'm trying to quit."

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

Instead of saying, "I'm not a smoker", right? And putting that identity and that mindset and being intentional about that and creating habits that create that. So you've got these habits in the morning, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

Devotionals. You've got these things that you're doing that establish something for you to take control of your day, be intentional about your day. So then, that is a habit that creates outcomes for the rest of the day.

DAVE ANDERSON:

It does. And you know, I'm aware of the outcomes I want to create. I've got very clear goals. I've got inspiring goals. But if the activities create the outcomes, we need to give disproportionate focus to the activities. First of all, choosing the right ones. Not all activities have equal value, right? A lot of times we confuse motion for progress. We mistake activity for accomplishment and we mistake speed for direction. I'm going really fast but it's not necessarily in the right direction. And so, it's these handful of key activities. I call it my big four, my landing place. And again, there are 40 things I probably have to do, but man, there's so much power and clarity that when I walk in, I know what to say no to. A lot of people do not know what to say no to. And so, they're spreading themselves way too thin. They're doing 40 things and leaving a blur and they're not spending enough time on the four or five things that would actually leave a mark.

And I become very jealous of my time as I get older. I wish I'd have figured it out as a younger guy. I'm going to be 60 next month. I was into my 40s before I started getting a greater appreciation for time and how precious it is and how I can't get more of it. And it's like, if someone were to come into my office and they wanted to steal my paintings or my decor or my trophies or whatever, I'd fight for those things. I wouldn't let them have it. But the fact is, I can replace all those things. If they want to come in and take my time, usually we just give it to them. We'd give it to them on the phone. We give it to them. People with nothing to do want to do it with you. They come into your office. We let people take our time all day and we can't replace it. We'd fight for the stuff that we can replace and we give away freely the stuff that we can't. And it makes no sense.

SKOT WALDRON:

Amen. Wow. That's profound. I love it. Let's talk about performance. You mentioned that, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Right.

SKOT WALDRON:

What's the difference between just being a good performer or a great performer? We've got different levels of good, better, best, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

And we've heard that before. What's this idea between good and great? How do you distinguish between good and great performers?

DAVE ANDERSON:

You know, my book Unstoppable, I talk about four different levels of performers. Undertaker, caretaker, playmaker, game changer. They're kind of self explanatory, but the two top groups, playmaker and game changer. The primary difference between those two is consistency. The game changer does the right things far more consistently and is always looking to do them with greater excellence. A lot of times we always think it's going to take something different to get us where we want to go. Sometimes. But, very often, we're doing the right things but we've gotten in a rut, we're going through the motions and we're not doing them as well as we could. We're making those outgoing calls, but we've just gotten into this routine. We're not finding ways to be more engaging to set better appointments or whatever the case may be. So, the game changer is more consistent and is focused more on excellent.

Excellent means superior or eminent. A lot of people think that means, "Okay, if I'm excellent, I have to be superior to you." But that may not be the case at all. I can be superior to you performance wise and still be worse than I used to be. That's not excellent. That's decline. True excellence is being superior to my former self. So I'm continually looking for ways to beat the person I was yesterday, all right? To be my best, not just to be the best. Because I'll tell you, if I keep becoming my best, I will be the best. But it can be a very false sense of accomplishment to be the best just because others are not as good as you, not because you're better than you once were. And so, the game changer is more consistently bringing excellence and consistency to the table with the things that matter most. That's the separator.

But you just can't will your way into consistency. I say it's not a matter of will, it's a matter of why. You've got to have a why that forces you to be consistent, that doesn't give you the option not to do it. It goes right back to what I said earlier. If your why is strong enough, you'll do it regardless of whether you feel like it or not. Too many people that their feelings hijack their future, "Oh, I didn't feel like doing it so I didn't do it today." Well, you've got to learn how to subordinate your feelings to your future and have a why that doesn't give you the option not to do what you need to do to get to where you want to go. So, consistency is not just luck, it's not just will. It's based in the why, and then constantly looking for ways to do it better.

If you'll do that, you'll never get complacent because there's always ways to improve. You'll stay out of ruts. How can I have a better attitude today than yesterday? How can I handle even that guy that cut me off in traffic yesterday? I don't like the way I handled that. All right? I let him get under my skin. I'll never see them again. I didn't handle it well. I had this terrible inner dialogue going on for the next two minutes and I wasted two minutes of my life. How can I handle that better? Or whatever the case may be. How can I do a better job of keeping a commitment? I broke a commitment. Maybe you say, "You know what? I didn't keep the commitment yesterday." And so, that's an integrity issue. It's not just that I got busy. It's that I said I would do something and I didn't do it. That's become part of my brand. How do I never let that happen again? And so, I find that makes life very exciting. But you got to be very intentional.

One of the things I do in the book Intentional Mindset is I give people 10 traits. They spend a week on each trait. And I give them a grading scale. They'll spend a week on attitude. They'll spend a week on competitiveness, primarily competing with who they were the day before. They'll spend a week on character. It spells out the acronym ACCREDITED. Attitude, character, competitiveness, rigor, effort, and so forth. There are seven aspects of each trait. And they're grading themselves. At the end of the day, "How did I do here?" It's self-reflection. It's evaluating and adjusting. It's watching the game film of your day. It's a very intentional way to improve yourself rather than just reading a book.

So many people get through a book, but they don't get from a book. So I created the 70-day course for people who want to do it, to spend a week on 10 different traits, to take what you learn in the book and really turn it into action. That's what gets us to the next level, not just shots of adrenaline. Somebody listens to a podcast, they go to a class, they read a book, to me that's an event. Events create adrenaline. Process creates change, okay? Some of us are just addicted to events. We get that shot of adrenaline, we get that buzz. It's like that Red Bull, right? Red bull for the mind and then we crash later because we don't do anything with it.

SKOT WALDRON:

So true. And that's where we get into what are those things that really create long lasting behavioral change. And that's when you get into those micro steps, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

The things that we can do on a micro level that may not make a big change today, but if I change 1% every day, I'm going to be a lot better by the end of the year, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Without a doubt. See, we don't understand the compounding effect of small right activities or small wrong activities because there's not always an immediate consequence for it. It's like if you do a lot of the right stuff today, you're not always rewarded for it today. That's one reason why people stopped doing it. "Well, I made some prospecting calls. I didn't sell anything, and so prospecting doesn't work for me" or whatever. But we forget that these results come over time, not overnight.

And at the same time, they do the wrong thing. They take a shortcut. They don't keep a commitment. There's not always an immediate consequence. They'd be better off if there were something came along and knocked them upside their head and got them back on track. But because there's no immediate consequence, they keeps sleeping in. They keep making excuses. They keep blaming other people. They keep badmouthing another department. They continue to not work on themselves. Eventually, it catches up with them too, not overnight, but over time. The compounding effect of something most people do not understand. And those micro steps you talk about can work for you or against you over time depending on which steps you're taking.

SKOT WALDRON:

Your next book, number 16, is going to be little tiny phrases that I've heard from Dave Anderson that blew my mind. Right? I think that's going to be your next book. I've got them all written down. I'm trying to write as fast as you talk because you've got some awesome, awesome ways of thinking about things that make people go, "Oh yeah. Yeah, that makes sense", right? And so, thank you for that.

DAVE ANDERSON:

You know why, Skot? Because it's not academic. It's basic. It's common sense. It really is. It really is common sense. But that doesn't mean it's easy. Because it's simple to understand doesn't mean it's easy. If it were easy, everybody were doing it. People say, "Well, Dave, to stay with this course of 70 days, I mean, that's not easy. Life gets in the way." I said, "I understand that. I'm not saying this is easy. I'm saying it's worth it." You got to quit looking for what's easy. The whole world is looking for what's easy. They're addicted to instant gratification. And look at where most of the masses are out there right now. It's probably not where you want to be.

They're probably not driving where you want to drive, living where you want to live, making what you want to make and engaging in having a difference like you want to have, right? You want to be like them? Then do what they're doing. But if you want to do better than them, you're going to have to do things they're not doing. You can't do what comes naturally. You got to do what's unnatural. What's unnatural is to do the stuff you don't feel like doing. What's natural is, "I don't feel like doing it so I'm not going to do it." You want to grow beyond natural. The average people are doing what's natural.

SKOT WALDRON:

So true. So what holds people back then? What holds people back from ultimately doing that next thing to being excellent or to being a high performer or from whatever? What is that? I would love to know because I want to make sure my kids know this. I want to know for myself, right? But is this something I could teach my kids too, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Sure.

SKOT WALDRON:

What does that thing that holds us back?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Well, first, you got to look at what it's not. It's not everyone else and everything else. And this is what people like to hang their hat on. They whip out their black belt and blame. "It was the way I was raised. It was the school I went to. It's my ethnic background. It's my education." All of these are outside conditions, but it really boils down to inside decisions. Okay, we all go through stuff. That's not the point. We can have a class. And everybody's got a story. Everybody's had some difficulty, either health, finances, relationship, kids, whatever. What makes us different is how we choose to handle it. We've got to make better decisions. Quit focusing on conditions to make better decisions. And one of the decisions is to get clear about what I want. Most people don't have that clarity in their lives.

And so, when you're not clear about what you want and why you want it... Let me take the why to another level. Part of a why is when I was living in a dump, I lived in a house with rats for a year when I was 19 years old. Our family restaurant business had gone broke. It was back in '79. Yeah, it was a tough economy then and all these excuses. But I was able to find three jobs because I lived in a house infested with rats for a year without any furniture, sleeping in a sleeping bag. Now, my why was to get a couch. My why was to have different food to eat other than what I was eating. But it was really the why behind the why. It's not just the couch. What's that couch going to provide? Okay. It's going to provide comfort. It's going to provide a little bit more self-esteem. It's going to provide a little bit less embarrassment if somebody comes over to the house.

It's not just why do you want that house, why do you want that car. What's the why behind it? How are you going to feel driving it? And will it be safer? Will your family enjoy it more? Why do you want that house? What types of holidays can you have in that house? What type of entertaining can you do? How are you going to feel pulling up to it? It's not just the why. It's the why behind the why that makes you unstoppable. I've got too many reasons not to do the right thing today. I've got too many reasons to where I can afford to quit. And so, we got to get clear. People do not have clarity. They don't even know what type of person they want to become. Forget about what they want to do. They don't even know what type of person they want to become.

In the Why workbook, one of the areas is virtue, okay? What virtues do you want to develop? Do you want to become more positive? Do you want to become more consistent? Do you want to be better at keeping commitments? Do you want to become more humble? I mean, you can't hit targets you haven't defined. And so, if you're not clear about what you want, you will be all over the place. You will be inconsistent. There's not anything that you want bad enough to keep doing the right things and to put in the work to get them. It all starts with clarity. You're going to have to have it all figured out.

But even a young person has to have some general idea of what I'm trying to become, the type of person I want to become. What type of friends do I want to have? What type of things do I want to learn? I mean, get that clarity in your life. Clarity is power. That's what the why is. The why is immense clarity in your life. Now you can make decisions based on that clarity. I'll say yes to this. I'll say no to that. I'll say yes to this person. I'll say no to that person because that person is going to make it a lot tougher to become the type of person I'm wanting to become.

SKOT WALDRON:

It's choosing to be great, not just good, right?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Yeah.

SKOT WALDRON:

Because I can be good and say yes to everybody.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Right.

SKOT WALDRON:

Or I can be great and learn to say yes to the people and to the things that are going to help make me great.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Absolutely. And if I'm trying to get great, you know what? It's not about making everybody happy. Because if you're trying to be great, you're going to make some people unhappy. Not everybody can have your time. You're not going to go to the places you used to go. You're not going to spend time doing some of the things you used to do. It's not about making everyone happy, it's about getting better. And if you're leading people, it's not about making them happy. Come on. You're not tequila or ice cream or a clown. All right? Your job is to get them better. Those things make people happy. You're going to do some things that make them unhappy. You're going to hold them accountable. You're going to give them feedback they may not want to hear. You're going to make them uncomfortable by stretching them with higher expectations. Our job is not to make people happy. It's to get them better. And it's to get us better so we can get them better. And then, when they get better, they tend to get a little happier in most cases.

SKOT WALDRON:

So true. So true. Well, your book, Intentional Mindset, it's out now. Where can people get ahold of that?

DAVE ANDERSON:

Well, they can get a hold of it at Amazon. Amazon got the books before we did. Isn't that something? They got the books before the author.

SKOT WALDRON:

Of course, they did.

DAVE ANDERSON:

They always [crosstalk 00:28:36].

SKOT WALDRON:

Of course, they did.

DAVE ANDERSON:

You can get it at Amazon, Barnes & Noble. You can get it at our website. It's learntolead.com. You spell it out just like it sounds. We have a lot of free stuff there in a section called the Insider Club. learntolead.com, Insider Club. The Why workbook you can download. The whole 70-day course you can download. None of it costs anything. The 70 videos there that support the 70-days, it's all free. They're one, two, three minute videos. It's a good resource for you to grow yourself and to help others grow.

SKOT WALDRON:

This has been amazing. Just hearing your soundbites should be fuel and fire for anybody to go out and get their hands on this book. You're just unstoppable. I mean, just hearing you talk about that, it's been really fantastic.

DAVE ANDERSON:

[inaudible 00:29:21].

SKOT WALDRON:

I appreciate you being here. Good luck with the launch and everything you're doing. You just continue to inspire. You're doing an awesome job.

DAVE ANDERSON:

Thank you. It's been a pleasure. I appreciate your kind words and courtesy, Skot.

SKOT WALDRON:

Soundbite King. Am I right? Holy moly. Here we go. All right. I got a few notes here. Killer instinct is what will get you started. Mental toughness is what keeps you going, right? It fuels it. It keeps it rolling. We need both. We need that killer instinct to just go after it, to fight, to get that initial thing. And then we need that mental toughness that's going to hold us out, right? We need that clarity about our why. We need to understand what that why is. That's what's going to fuel us. A lot of people don't have that clarity and so they flounder. They don't know what they're doing. As I was doing this morning, right? I was floundering. I didn't have a purpose of the day. I wasn't clear on my actions for the day. So, thank you for calling me to repentance for that. We confuse motion for progress. We confuse speed for direction. We can be going really fast in the wrong direction. We could have motion. We're doing stuff and we think we're making progress, but not. So check yourself on that.

Let's see. Consistency. Make sure we're consistent in our actions. Things happen over time, not over night, right? I'm going to get that on a t-shirt. So good. And we start to blame things on our conditions instead of really just making those decisions that are going to transform our lives. And it all starts with intentionality. So his book, Intentional Mindset, is what this is all about. I'm really, really grateful for you, Dave. Thanks for being on the show. Thank you for the soundbites. It's so good. If you all want to find out more information about me, you can go to skotwaldron.com. I've got a lot of resources there. All these videos are there and interviews that I've done with others that are going to inspire and drive you. And follow me on YouTube. Like, subscribe, share. Do all those things. I would love to stay in touch with you. So thank you again for being on another episode of Unlocked. I'll see you next time.

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